15 Years of Canadarm2 in 15 Pictures

Canadarm2 15 Years

, marks the 15th anniversary of the launch of Canada's iconic second-generation robotic technology, Canadarm2. Since its debut in space, the 17-metre robotic arm has proven to be an invaluable addition to the International Space Station (ISS) by assembling crucial elements of the Station, assisting in spacewalks, catching a multitude of spacecrafts and unloading many payloads. Here are 15 pictures to highlight the incredible 15 years (and counting) of Canadarm2.

Robotic handshake in Space

A Canadian robotic "handshake in space" occurred on as Canadarm2 (right) transferred its launch cradle to Endeavour's robotic arm. Canadian Space Agency Astronaut Chris Hadfield, STS-100 mission specialist, was at the controls of Canadarm from the shuttle. (Credit: NASA)

Astronaut Chris Hadfield on mission STS-100 spacewalk

On , Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut Chris Hadfield ventured out from Space Shuttle Endeavour into the vacuum of space to attach Canadarm2 to the Destiny Module of the ISS. This marked the debut of Canadarm2 and the first spacewalk for a Canadian, a milestone in Canadian space exploration history. (Credit: NASA)

Canadarm2 - Images of a 10-Year History

Mission STS-114 in was known as "The Return to Flight," being the first shuttle launch since the Columbia tragedy. Among its many tasks, Canadarm2 assisted astronauts during their spacewalks. In this image, NASA astronaut Stephen Robinson is held aloft by Canadarm2 during the crew's third spacewalk. (Credit: NASA)

The Canadarm(s) at Work

The Canadarm and Canadarm2 worked together on to unload cargo from the payload bay of Space Shuttle Endeavour. (Credit: NASA)

Columbus laboratory

The CSA played a key role in assembly of the Columbus laboratory on the ISS as it was moved into place with Canadarm2. (Credit: NASA)

Canadarm2 - Images of a 10-Year History

During Shuttle Mission STS-123 in 2008, Canadarm2 was joined by the Canadian-built Dextre, which Space Shuttle Endeavour delivered to the ISS. Canadarm2 removed the robotic handyman from the shuttle's payload bay and transferred it to the ISS. The Station arm also assisted with a spacewalk that gave Dextre a new set of hands called Orbital Replacement Unit/Tool Changeout Mechanisms. In this image, NASA astronaut Rick Linnehan, while anchored to Canadarm2, mimics the gangly Dextre. (Credit: NASA)

The international Space Station

The Integrated Cargo Carrier is moved on Canadarm2 on . (Credit: NASA)

Canadarm2 - Images of a 10-Year History

NASA astronaut Robert Satcher has a look at the end effector of the robotic arm on . (Credit: NASA)

The Final Spacewalk and a New Home for the Inspection Boom

The Inspection Boom, seen here attached to the Station, was transferred to the Station during the fourth and final spacewalk of Shuttle Mission STS-134 on . (Credit: NASA)

Canadarm2 catches the Dragon resupply ship

SpaceX's Dragon capsule made history when it became the first private spacecraft to be grappled by Canadarm2 and dock with the ISS on . (Credit: NASA)

Canadarm2 and HTV-3

Canadarm2 secures the HTV-3 exposed pallet to the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle in August 2012. (Credit: NASA)

Canadarm2 and Dextre

The International Space Station's Canadarm2 and Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), carry the Rapidscat instrument assembly after removing it from the trunk of the SpaceX Dragon cargo ship (upper right) on . (Credit: NASA)

Image of an aurora and Canadarm2 from space

Image of an aurora and Canadarm2 taken on , by NASA astronaut Scott Kelly during his one-year mission on the ISS. (Credit: NASA)

Canadarm2 attaches BEAM

Canadarm2 attached the first expandable module to the ISS during the night of -. Canadarm2 removed the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) from Dragon's trunk and installed it on the ISS. (Credit: NASA)

Image of Canadarm2 on the $5 Canadian note

Canadarm2 is on the Canadian $5 note! Robotics innovation is Canada's ongoing contribution to the International Space Station program and demonstrates Canada's commitment to space exploration. (Credit: Bank of Canada)

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